Vice presidential fact check: Daniel Dale selects his lie of the night



Vice President Mike Pence echoed some of President Donald Trump’s most common falsehoods and misleading statements during the lone vice presidential debate with Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) — though in a more restrained, neatly packaged way.
The Salt Lake City debate was a less chaotic affair when compared to September’s first meeting between Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden. But there were traces of that event in Pence’s delivery of some of the same lines that the President often repeats.
Harris, too, made some claims that were misleading or lacked context, but those paled in comparison to the litany of statements from Pence that were either untrue or needed additional context.
Coronavirus and the Trump administration’s response dominated the start of the debate and was referenced throughout, and the threat of the virus — due to the plexiglass barriers separating each desk — was apparent before either candidate spoke a word. The rivals also argued over economic recovery, the future of health care in America and the importance of tackling the climate crisis.

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Andrew Yang explains climate plan and how he can beat Donald Trump



During a town hall in New Hampshire, Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang answers why he believes he is the best candidate to face President Donald Trump on the 2020 debate stage, how he’ll deal with the climate crisis, and where the economy is failing Americans.

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